Tuesday, September 13, 2005

dream blog



What's your dream blog?


What's preventing your blog from being perfect? Can you start doing something to remove these obstacles? Why not start now?

When you dream of how you wish your blog could be, what do you see?

30 to 100 comments on each post? How will you repy to them?

Better template? More color? Easier to read typeface? Fewer ads?

How much has your blog changed during the last 12 months?

If it hasn't changed, why not?

Dream of the best blog you could possibly have, then start doing something, anything, to begin the process of achieving your goals.

I may start a blog on WordPress.

I may actually start a self-assaulting blog called Mothers Against Vaspers the Grate. And a blog called Stinky Ugly Toys.

Then again, maybe I won't.

Did you know that some rather famous marketing bloggers have taken breaks, totally changed their blogging style (unfortunately warning us that more personal stuff is coming), or abandoned the blogsophere altogether, for various reasons?

Jennifer Rice, at What's Your Brand Mantra blog, has this to say...

[QUOTE]

"Blog Depression"

http://brand.blogs.com/mantra/
2005/08/blog-depression.html

July 08, 2005

Still around...

But unfortunately hit burn-out on this blog during the past month. I resonate with Kirsten at re:invention when she says,

"After 3 long blogging years, re:invention's blog has quietly folded into a cocoon. At the moment, we feel we have nothing to say... "

Ironically, I'm headed off to Chicago on Sunday to speak at Ad:Tech on how social technologies (like blogs) are changing the way we do business.

I still have a lot to say on the subject, but not on a blog. At least not right this moment. I think I'm starting to warm back up again; perhaps I just needed a break from all the brainpower that's required to write compelling posts.



[END QUOTE]


How I See and Say It

Friends, if I (which is doubtful) ever run out of "things to say" (you should be so lucky), I promise here and now that I won't shut up. I'll have plenty to say about why I came to have nothing to say, and what this "having-nothing-to-sayness" has to say about our culture and our values.

I will not leave you to take a vacation from blogging. That would be, in my mind, rude and selfish. Other bloggers have every right to pause or kill their blogging. I cannot follow their example.

I probably would take a break from blogging, if I had some substitute for it, but I already do everything I want to do, in addition to blogging.

Operating a blog is pretty easy, requires only a little vigorous thought, a slight amount of intense concentration, not much eating or sleeping, plus a tiny bit of online research or offline reading, and is not, or need not be, time-consuming, at least not all the time.

Some are physically and psychologically addicted to blogging. The very thought of seeing the screen all lit up with ones blog becomes a gateway event leading to a pronounced loss of external reality, accompanied by intense, prolonged euphoria. No existing therapy or medication has proven to be of any value to sufferers.

Once hooked, deep within, a casual blogger turns into an always blogger, a hardcore blogger for life, there is no end and no escape.

I'm blog-embedded.

I don't know where I end and my blog begins, nor where my blog ends and I begin. I don't know what I'm supposed to be doing when I'm not blogging. Nothing interests me, outside the confines of bloggers and the blogosphere, except the music I must listen to as I blog.


I cannot extract myself from my blog. I am eternally trapped within it. I cannot get out, so I must make the best of it, and try to write an interesting blog.



Hardcore Blogger Anthem

To live, I must blog.

To blog, I must dream.

To dream, I must imagine.

To imagine, I must work.

To work is to blog,

or prepare for blogging.

I have other work,

but blog is real work.


::::
===

8 comments:

carrie said...

i wish i could be more embedded in my blog. it's horrible when the computer is not at my fingertips. good blogging takes lots of time and attention. better blogging requires photoshop and a digital camera.

Zafufilia said...

Hey Steven,

Did you hear that senator talking about the blogosphere and quoting from a blog during the John Roberts hearing????

Z

MARYBETH said...

heya Steven ,
I have an idea...how about VTG SCHOOL OF BLOGOLOGY!!!
THE BEST TAUGHT STEPS TO INOVATIVE BLOGGING ON THE PLANET!
LIVE INTERACTIVE SESSIONS, IF FOLLOWED FAITHFULLY, WILL LEAD TO THE EVOLUTION OF UNPRECEDENTED BLOG FORMS
WHAT SAY YOU GRATE VASPERS??

steven edward streight said...

Carrie: I agree.

Zaf: No. Is there a link to a news item on this? It reminds me, this blogosphere, of a drug. If a person starts smoking pot, then suddenly, any reference, in any format, to cannabis, weed, reefer, blunt, chronic, endo, skunk, etc., becomes a matter of heightenend interest and exuberance.

marybeth: my two books on this subject will be published, just as soon as the other blog books (by Hugh Hewitt, BL Ochman, Debbie Weil, Scoble/Israel, Jeremy Wright, etc.) pave the way.

I have also conducted a special seminar on "Internet Dangers and Opportunities".

Deep down inside, I want to be a computer security expert. I have a long way to go, and a lot to learn in this specialized field. I also want to do something with the Interplanetary Internet, Vint Cerf, and Google...someday.

MARYBETH said...

Good Morning Steven,

Why wait???

There is No Time Like The Present!!!

besides... there are VERY FEW instructional Blog Books Out there!

OR JUST DO IT VIA A BLOG!!!!

instead of mothers against VTG-----

TEACH,

INSTRUCT

Use your brilliance , while making it SIMPLE,

ACCESSIBLE,

UNDERSTANDABLE

for the thousands of Left brain dominated folk like ME!!!

otherwise I will be left with no choice, other then buying for the second time, that book about Blogging!!!
who was the author??

steven edward streight said...

I probably would do eve3rythi5ng spontaneously simultaneously if I could, but the physical multiverse in which we project our wishes is stubbornly systematic and regularly burdensome.

My wife are moving into a private bungalow in a secluded spot of a restricted district, and I'm packing up the office library right now as we speak.

The computer's going to be dismantled and readied for transplant either tonight or tomorrow.

I may be incommunicado for a very few days. Probably won't even be noticed by most.

MARYBETH said...

What in the Sam Hell is a restricted district???

are you moving to CUBA?? =)

BE gentle in moving the puter
it is the medium through which VTG speaks
oh..
be careful LIFTING anything of ANY noticable weight

I am experiencing the aftermath of this myself and
Its AIN"T AT TALL pleasent =(
N A m a s t e

Zafufilia said...

Steven,

The closest I can find to a link is this:

http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/weblog/oped/

Scroll down and find the following quote, which seems to provide a reference to the original blog the senator referenced in the hearing (although there's no mention of "blog" in the portion of his comments quoted here).

"Like LiveCurrent's Edward Lazarus, Jim Lindgren at the Volokh Conspiracy isn't buying Roberts' baseball analogy:

Roberts' comparison of a judge to a baseball umpire reminds me of an old story about three different versions of judicial reasoning, built on the same analogy.

First umpire: “Some are balls and some are strikes, and I call them as they are.”

Second umpire: “Some are balls and some are strikes, and I call them as I see 'em.”

Third umpire: “Some are balls and some are strikes, but they ain’t nothin' ‘til I call 'em.”

Three views of legal reasoning are represented here....

Hey, it made sense to Sen. Sam Brownback (R-Kansas), who said this morning:

And I guess that [baseball metaphor] appealed to me as well from the standpoint of where we are today's American governance, where the legislature can pass the bill, the executive can sign it, but everybody waits and holds their breath until how the court is going to look at this and how it's going to interpret it, because it seems as if the court is the real mover of what the actual law is. And that's a bad thing. The umpire should call the ball fair or foul — it's in or it's out — but not get actively involved as a player on the field."